images 1321/03/2018

The sheds of all the 10 platforms of the Allahabad Junction, of North Central Railways (NCR), would do more than saving the passengers from sunlight and rains. The rooftops of these platforms would harness 683 kilowatt of solar energy through the solar panels installed on the entire length of these roofs.

Apart from installing solar panels on the platforms of Allahabad Junction, rooftops of various buildings of not only Allahabad division but also of several stations of NCR would be installed with such solar panels after which NCR would save an amount of around Rs 30 lakhs annually.

Of these, the rooftop of GM office, Subedarganj, would produce 266 kilowatt (KW) of electricity, divisional railway manager (DRM) office would produce 150 kw, Allahabad Junction 166 KW, Loco shed Kanpur 349 KW, Kanpur junction 100 KW. In totality, 16.42 lakh unit of electricity would be produced. These already installed units have started saving electricity charges of NCR worth Rs 30 lakhs, informed chief public relation officer, NCR, G K Bansal.

Besides, solar panels, for generating 2.7 MW of electricity would be installed on rooftops of various buildings under NCR. Under this proposal, solar panels, for producing 683 KW of electricity would be installed at Allahabad junction alone.

The panels, already installed at roof tops of Allahabad Junction is producing 166KW of electricity which would be saving an amount of worth Rs 4.9 lakhs per annum. In the ongoing work, authorities are in the process of fixing the solar panels at all the platforms following which a total of 680KW of electricity would be produced.

“Presently, work is in the process on the rooftops of platform number 4, 6, 7 and 8 and will be started at the remaining platforms barring platform number One and the entire work would be completed within this month which include installing and energizing the setup”, said CPRO.

The work for installing solar panels at Allahabad Junction is being carried out with full dedication because of which almost half of the area of the lengthy roof of these platforms have already been covered with high capacity solar panels, which would be capable of working in all weather conditions, he added.

121/03/2018

In a reversal of the upbeat sentiment prevailing in solar energy last year, two recent solar auctions – one in Maharashtra and the other in Karnataka – have failed to attract enough bidders, leading to their repeated postponement.

Though India added a record 7,295 MW in 2017-18 until February end, and bid out another 10,500 MW through the year, Maharashtra’s latest 1,000 MW solar auction received bids of only 530 MW and thus had to be postponed for the fourth time. The auction, first announced by the Maharashtra State Electricity Distribution Co Ltd (MSEDCL) in December last year, had been put off three times earlier already. Its third deadline of February 23, received only two bids, while the fourth for March 9, again drew bids of just 530 MW.

Similarly, Karnataka’s 1,200 MW auction for projects at the Pavagada Solar Park drew bids of only 550 MW at the second effort. The Karnataka Renewable Energy Development Ltd (KREDL), which is holding the auction, initially set the last date for bid submission at February 21 but attracted only two bids of 100 MW each. The second deadline was set for March 2, and drew bids of just 550 MW.

With over 90% of solar equipment being imported, solar developers have become cautious ever since the Directorate of Safeguard Duty, reacting to a complaint from local solar manufacturers, proposed imposing 70% safeguard duty on imported solar panels in January this year on the grounds that such imports were crippling local industry. At the same time, the Directorate of Anti Dumping and Allied Duties (DGAD) has been separately considering another petition from local manufacturers seeking imposition of anti-dumping duty on imports. Developers prefer imports over local products because the former are 25-30% cheaper.

At first, developers stayed away from both the Maharashtra and Karnataka auctions because their bid documents did not include a crucial clause relating to ‘change of law’ – that the winning tariff would be renegotiated if any rules relating to the solar segment changed (such as the imposition of either safeguard duty or anti-dumping duty). “Maharashtra has still not agreed to absorb the duties, which is why developers are reluctant to bid,” said Vinay Rustagi, managing director of solar consultancy Bridge to India.

Karnataka, however, did incorporate the provision the second time it called for bids and yet has found few takers. “Working out precisely how much the tariff should be revised upwards, if indeed safeguard duty or anti-dumping duty is imposed on solar modules, will be another challenge. The question isn’t of law alone. It is not easy to pass on any duty. Developers and discoms are unlikely to agree on the extent of the hit. That is the main reason developers have shunned this auction.”

Yet another issue at the Karnataka auction is the maximum tariff that KREDL has set above which it will not consider bids. “The ceiling tariff of Rs 2.93 per unit which KREDL has set is too low,” said Rustagi. “Karnataka has comparatively low solar radiation and charges at the Pavagada Solar Park are fairly high.”

In KREDL’s last solar auction for 860 MW, conducted across different talukas of Karnataka, winning tariffs had varied between Rs 2.94 and Rs 3.54 per unit. “The previous auction had a much higher price limit,” said Rustagi. KREDL set the ceiling tariff at Rs 2.93 per unit in the subsequent auction in a bid to drive prices further down, but clearly developers feel prices have already reached their limit.

The lowest solar tariff reached so far has been Rs 2.44 per unit at Rajasthan’s Bhadla Solar Park in May 2017, but Rajasthan’s solar radiation is much higher than Karnataka’s.

Rustagi maintained that even Solar Corporation of India (SECI) has been postponing its solar auctions, because it fears these would see tariffs rising. “SECI bids are being constantly postponed,” he said. “Its pipeline is stuck because it does not want the tariff to go up.”

Queries with SECI, MSEDL and KREDL remained unanswered. “Neither Maharashtra nor Karnataka has decided what to do next,” said Rustagi.

21/03/2018

Gujarat Industries Power Co has issued a Letter of Intent dated 19 March 2018 to Bharat Heavy Electricals (BHEL) for Design, Engineering, Supply & Procurement, Construction, Erection, Testing, Commissioning and Operation & Maintenance (O&M) of 75 MW (AC) Solar Power Project at Gujarat Solar Park, Charanka, Dist: Patan in Gujarat, on Engineering, Procurement and Construction (EPC) Basis.

21/03/2018

The waste-to-energy project proposed to be set up at Brahmapuram that had been mired in controversy will be on track soon. The foundation stone of the first phase of the project will be laid in April.

The construction of the first phase of the project, which is to treat garbage will be completed by January 2019.

In the first phase, a plant to process the garbage and produce refuse derived fuel (RDF) which is in the form of bricks would be set up.

In the second phase, the gasification plant to generate energy from the RDF will be constructed. “It is learnt that the project has got all the necessary approvals except a couple. There was a suggestion that the foundation stone of the first phase will be laid on March 22. As Kochi corporation’s budget will be presented on March 24, we won’t get much time for organizing a befitting ceremony where chief minister will lay the foundation stone of the project. So, the project will be inaugurated in April,” said V K Minimol, chairperson, standing committee for health, Kochi corporation.

According to GJ Eco Power Private Limited, the private partner of the public private-partnership project, they have taken all measures to start the work without any delay. “It is through single window clearance system that different approvals for the project are being given. The preliminary approvals from the agencies like pollution control board, factories and boilers department, fire and rescue department and town planning department are almost through,” said Amith Viswanath, head, corporate affairs, GJ Eco Power Private Limited. “Given the immediacy of the waste treatment facilities for the entire city, we would be starting the construction of waste processing unit first. The entire project including second phase will be over within 18 months,” he said.

Following Kochi corporation’s difficulty in implementing the waste-to-energy plant proposed at Brahmapuram, the state had entrusted overall monitoring of the project to district collector. The government had viewed that the district collector use powers of revenue department and that of the district magistrate for speedy implementation of the project.

Last month, Kochi corporation had handed over 20 acres in Brahmapuram to GJ Eco Power Private Limited for starting the construction of the plant. Though some extent of land was wetland where construction is not allowed, the government gave exemption to it.

The construction of the project designed in 2015 had been stuck in controversies and lack of various clearances. The total cost of the project, which will generate 10 MW of electricity, is 295 crore. The promoters of the project envisage that 85% of the total revenue can be generated from electricity produced at the plant.

21/03/2018

The sheds of all the 10 platforms of the Allahabad Junction, of North Central Railways (NCR), would do more than saving the passengers from sunlight and rains. The rooftops of these platforms would harness 683 kilowatt of solar energy through the solar panels installed on the entire length of these roofs.

Apart from installing solar panels on the platforms of Allahabad Junction, rooftops of various buildings of not only Allahabad division but also of several stations of NCR would be installed with such solar panels after which NCR would save an amount of around Rs 30 lakhs annually.

Of these, the rooftop of GM office, Subedarganj, would produce 266 kilowatt (KW) of electricity, divisional railway manager (DRM) office would produce 150 kw, Allahabad Junction 166 KW, Loco shed Kanpur 349 KW, Kanpur junction 100 KW. In totality, 16.42 lakh unit of electricity would be produced. These already installed units have started saving electricity charges of NCR worth Rs 30 lakhs, informed chief public relation officer, NCR, G K Bansal.

Besides, solar panels, for generating 2.7 MW of electricity would be installed on rooftops of various buildings under NCR. Under this proposal, solar panels, for producing 683 KW of electricity would be installed at Allahabad junction alone.

The panels, already installed at roof tops of Allahabad Junction is producing 166KW of electricity which would be saving an amount of worth Rs 4.9 lakhs per annum. In the ongoing work, authorities are in the process of fixing the solar panels at all the platforms following which a total of 680KW of electricity would be produced.

“Presently, work is in the process on the rooftops of platform number 4, 6, 7 and 8 and will be started at the remaining platforms barring platform number One and the entire work would be completed within this month which include installing and energizing the setup”, said CPRO.

The work for installing solar panels at Allahabad Junction is being carried out with full dedication because of which almost half of the area of the lengthy roof of these platforms have already been covered with high capacity solar panels, which would be capable of working in all weather conditions, he added.

21/03/2018

In a reversal of the upbeat sentiment prevailing in solar energy last year, two recent solar auctions – one in Maharashtra and the other in Karnataka – have failed to attract enough bidders, leading to their repeated postponement.

Though India added a record 7,295 MW in 2017-18 until February end, and bid out another 10,500 MW through the year, Maharashtra’s latest 1,000 MW solar auction received bids of only 530 MW and thus had to be postponed for the fourth time. The auction, first announced by the Maharashtra State Electricity Distribution Co Ltd (MSEDCL) in December last year, had been put off three times earlier already. Its third deadline of February 23, received only two bids, while the fourth for March 9, again drew bids of just 530 MW.

Similarly, Karnataka’s 1,200 MW auction for projects at the Pavagada Solar Park drew bids of only 550 MW at the second effort. The Karnataka Renewable Energy Development Ltd (KREDL), which is holding the auction, initially set the last date for bid submission at February 21 but attracted only two bids of 100 MW each. The second deadline was set for March 2, and drew bids of just 550 MW.

With over 90% of solar equipment being imported, solar developers have become cautious ever since the Directorate of Safeguard Duty, reacting to a complaint from local solar manufacturers, proposed imposing 70% safeguard duty on imported solar panels in January this year on the grounds that such imports were crippling local industry. At the same time, the Directorate of Anti Dumping and Allied Duties (DGAD) has been separately considering another petition from local manufacturers seeking imposition of anti-dumping duty on imports. Developers prefer imports over local products because the former are 25-30% cheaper.

At first, developers stayed away from both the Maharashtra and Karnataka auctions because their bid documents did not include a crucial clause relating to ‘change of law’ – that the winning tariff would be renegotiated if any rules relating to the solar segment changed (such as the imposition of either safeguard duty or anti-dumping duty). “Maharashtra has still not agreed to absorb the duties, which is why developers are reluctant to bid,” said Vinay Rustagi, managing director of solar consultancy Bridge to India.

Karnataka, however, did incorporate the provision the second time it called for bids and yet has found few takers. “Working out precisely how much the tariff should be revised upwards, if indeed safeguard duty or anti-dumping duty is imposed on solar modules, will be another challenge. The question isn’t of law alone. It is not easy to pass on any duty. Developers and discoms are unlikely to agree on the extent of the hit. That is the main reason developers have shunned this auction.”

Yet another issue at the Karnataka auction is the maximum tariff that KREDL has set above which it will not consider bids. “The ceiling tariff of Rs 2.93 per unit which KREDL has set is too low,” said Rustagi. “Karnataka has comparatively low solar radiation and charges at the Pavagada Solar Park are fairly high.”

In KREDL’s last solar auction for 860 MW, conducted across different talukas of Karnataka, winning tariffs had varied between Rs 2.94 and Rs 3.54 per unit. “The previous auction had a much higher price limit,” said Rustagi. KREDL set the ceiling tariff at Rs 2.93 per unit in the subsequent auction in a bid to drive prices further down, but clearly developers feel prices have already reached their limit.

The lowest solar tariff reached so far has been Rs 2.44 per unit at Rajasthan’s Bhadla Solar Park in May 2017, but Rajasthan’s solar radiation is much higher than Karnataka’s.

Rustagi maintained that even Solar Corporation of India (SECI) has been postponing its solar auctions, because it fears these would see tariffs rising. “SECI bids are being constantly postponed,” he said. “Its pipeline is stuck because it does not want the tariff to go up.”

Queries with SECI, MSEDL and KREDL remained unanswered. “Neither Maharashtra nor Karnataka has decided what to do next,” said Rustagi.

images 2020/03/2018

Maharashtra Power Minister Chandrashekhar Bavankule told the Legislative Assembly that his department would try to bring the entire state under solar power.

 

The minister was speaking after the total demands of Rs 8,240 crore for power ministry were passed in the House.

"Of the total sanctioned amount, Rs 7000 crore is for farmers and the powerloom subsidy," he said.

The minister said the department was trying to bring the entire state under solar power.

"In the first phase, we are trying to bring Anganwadis, Zilla Parishad schools, and Water Lift Irrigation schemes under solar power," he said.

MultiLayer-Solar-Panel-320/03/2018

Solar power will soon light up Poura Bhavan, the Bidhannagar Municipal Corporation’s headquarters in Salt Lake. It will help the civic body to save several lakhs annually in the form of electricity bills.

Corporation mayor Sabyasachi Dutta said “It will be calculated how much electricity the solar panels would need to generate to light up the entire G+6 building”.

According to Salt Lake civic officials, the building has a large open space on the roof, which is ideal for installation of solar panels. Besides, there is space around the main building where the panels could be installed. The decision on where the panels will be set up is yet to be taken.

The initiative to turn Poura Bhavan green is a part of the larger plan to shift all streetlights in Salt Lake from sodium vapour to LED lights. According to figures, there are about 24,000 streetlight posts across Salt Lake and adjacent places.

Rough estimates show the civic authorities pay a monthly electricity bill of around Rs 1.5 crore. Once all the sodium vapour lamps are replaced with LED lights, about 60% of the current bills will be reduced.

A total of 351 old sodium vapour lamps were recently removed from the stretches of Broadway and Metro corridor near Karunamoyee and the civic authorities have decided that these old lamps will be equally distributed from ward 1 to ward 27 as a temporary arrangement.

A control room will be set up at Poura Bhavan and each LED lighting installation will have a sensor chip device, along with a timer fixed with it. The civic body will be able to keep track of all the lights through the sensor-based chip that will send out a signal to the control room in case of a technical glitch.

download 5920/03/2018

State-run power equipment maker Bhel said it has commissioned first unit of 110 MW of the Kishanganga hydro-electric project (HEP) of NHPC in Jammu and Kashmir.

Located on the river Kishanganga, a tributary of the Jhelum in Bandipora district, all the three units of the 340 MW project will generate 1,350 million units (MU) of clean electricity annually, a Bhel statement said.

The other two units are also in advanced stages of commissioning.

Bhel was entrusted with execution of the Electro-Mechanical (E&M) package for the project comprising design, manufacture, supply, installation and commissioning of Vertical Shaft Pelton Turbines and matching synchronous Generators, Controls & Monitoring (SCADA) System along with electrical and mechanical auxiliaries.

The equipment was supplied from Bhel's manufacturing units at Bhopal, Jhansi, Rudrapur and Bengaluru while the execution of works on site was carried out by the company's Power Sector Northern Region division and Transmission Business Group.

In J&K, Bhel has so far commissioned 31 Hydro sets with a cumulative capacity of 1,257 MW.

It is executing hydroelectric projects of more than 2,900 MW in the country and 2,940 MW in Bhutan which are at various stages of implementation.

Tuesday, 20 March 2018 15:41

Suzlon retains top spot in renewables

images 3320/03/2018

Volumes in India’s solar sector plunged by 70% during first nine months this fiscal owing to policy changes, but Suzlon has retained market leadership and is poised to bounce back as a vertically-integrated player, said group chief executive JP Chalasani.

During the plunge in the market, the company worked on significant fixed cost reductions and now hopes to gain significantly once the market reaches 6GW for executions next fiscal from a low of 1.5GW this fiscal, he said. “Even when volumes dipped, we made positive Ebidta (earnings before interest, depreciation, taxation and amortisation) and met all our financial obligations.”

For the nine-month period ended December 2017, Suzlon suffered a steep fall in net profit at Rs 85.84 crore, down from Rs 262.89 crore a year ago, on a lowered income of Rs 6,153 crore (Rs 7,779 crore). “The company, from an internal perspective, is quite stable and has come out of all the problems. We have been bringing out best products, technology wise. We are doing quite well on the R&D side with new products coming out regularly,” said Chalasani.

From a 19% market share in FY15, Suzlon improved market share to 26% in FY16 and further up at 33% in FY17 and retained 33% market share during the first nine months of FY18 as well.

“We get impacted more when volumes go down since we are a vertically-integrated company. But when the volumes go up, we will be in a significantly advantageous position being vertically-integrated company where our fixed costs are brought down.”

On the improving volumes, he said, award of some 6 GW of bidding was slated for this fiscal to be executed during the next fiscal. “Therefore, significant volumes are going to come up next fiscal. When it is volume game, we are best suited because we are a vertically-integrated company with lowest costs.”

Chalasani further said that Suzlon was also coming up with improved technology products that will help power producers improve productivity and reduce the cost per kilowatt of power generated, helping them to cover up for falling tariffs.

Though the pressure on margins will continue, Suzlon expects to significantly improve its top and bottomlines from the next fiscal, said Chalasani.

Having started offering technologies such as wind-solar hybrid, Suzlon is currently working on technologies like windsolar-gas-based power hybrid, wind-solar-hydro-based power, he said.

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